Academic Courses

We set rigorous standards in our college preparatory curriculum. Our AP and honors courses will prepare you to succeed once you graduate. To ensure your success, we created a personalized approach to education. Our exceptional faculty and supportive programs will meet you where you’re at and give you the tools you need to realize your full potential. We are small by design, so every student here is known and valued.

The Business and Technology Department believes that every student has the potential to be a creator, builder, or visionary. We meet the learner where they are and push them to achieve personal excellence. We do not judge a student by his or her past accomplishments or failures. We encourage each student to see his or failure as fertilizer for future success. We help them to build on their strengths and take their abilities to a higher level. Our goal is to create innovative and intrepid thinkers and problem solvers who embrace the impossible with a sense of excitement.

Computer Applications
This course will introduce and enhance student’s abilities to utilize the basic Google Suite, conduct Internet research, and develop an understanding of computer ethics. Students will participate in a variety of Internet Safety activities and assignments so they are prepared to properly use the Internet. Course content will include understanding hardware and software as it related to Chromebooks and PCs. Some examples of applications are word processing, presentation, spreadsheet, and email. Additional school-related applications will be introduced while the application of technology in post-secondary education and the workplace will be a focus.

Honors B-STEM Application Design and Implementation
In addition to the introduction to Google Suite, Internet safety, research, and computer ethics, this course will introduce the students to the entrepreneurial mindsets. Students will learn advanced computer applications which may include app development, web design principles, and an introduction to coding. As their final project, students will apply the skills learned through the semester to create a viable solution to a United Nations type problem.

B-STEM II Introduction to Technological Entrepreneurship
This course introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, using lessons from companies started in Silicon Valley that have ignited a revolution across the world. Students will study how the evolution of technology has changed 21st-century business. The focus of this course is for students to gain a real-world understanding of business concepts. Students will learn financial literacy and collaborate on team-based projects. In addition, students will gain practical experience by working with mentors from a variety of business fields. Students will work in teams to develop a working concept for a start-up business and participate in business competitions.

Honors Advanced Computer Applications
Students will extend concepts presented in Computer Applications to develop a fundamental understanding of a wider variety of applications through hands-on experience. The course will introduce students to basic webpage creation, online database querying, and command-line interface tools. Additionally, students will build confidence with object-oriented programming (OOP) through the study of Python and appreciate computer hardware and software interoperation.

NFTE/Corporate Experience
This course will offer entrepreneurship curricula that teach math and literacy skills in the context of building a business plan. The program is rigorous, experiential and practical to students’ futures. The students will compete with their business plans at various levels that include local, up to regional and national competition. In addition, this course will offer discussion and individual group activities to prepare the student as a candidate for a summer internship in the Holy Trinity School Friends for a Future program. The student will learn and practice skills including resume preparation, business etiquette, interviewing, and critical thinking activities for the world of work. Teamwork and commitment will be emphasized as part of the training. This call will also satisfy the consumer economics requirement.

Honors Design Thinking
This course is an outgrowth of our developing relationship with Northwestern University through the Farley Center. Design Thinking is a design methodology that provides a solution-based approach to solving problems. Through the use of Project Based Learning (PBL), students will embrace the Design Thinking concept in a semester-long class, team-taught in conjunction with Northwestern University EPIC Program personnel. Ultimately, students will create a feasible solution to address their identified problems. Students may enter a competition, work on their capstone project, or complete an independent study project during this course. The course will be offered in semester one. Opportunities for the Design Thinking workshops may occur outside of regularly scheduled class times. The Design Thinking course is recommended for honors students completing a capstone project and seeking an honors diploma, but open to all students.

AP Computer Science PrinciplesThe AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course engages students in the creative aspects of the field by allowing them to develop computational artifacts based on their interests. Students will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills by working individually and collaboratively to solve problems and will discuss and write about the impacts these solutions could have on their community, society, and the world. Students will have the option to take the Computer Science Principles AP exam in May.

Robotics Applications 
This course is designed to get students interested in and excited about the fields of engineering, mechatronics, and software development. Students design, construct, and program autonomous robots. The programs, mechanical principles, and circuits students will use are very similar to, and sometimes the same as, industrial applications developed by engineers. Robots are constructed using durable robot hardware sporting black anodized aluminum chassis and scoop, and servo motors. In addition, they will include surface-mounted BASIC Stamp control boards to host infrared object sensor electronics. Furthermore, each robot will include its own board bread, allowing students to design their own circuits. Qualifying students may compete in the national Robotics competition.

Robotics and Circuit Design 
Robotics and Circuit Design will build on the principles learned in Robotics Applications. Students will work in teams and build autonomous robots. They will be introduced to advanced circuit design through breadboarding and programming using the industry recognized C programming language. Students will design subroutines, learn to debug, manage sensors, control motors, and learn how to log data from real-time sensor events and navigation states in order to isolate robotic misbehaviors. Multi-core processors will be used to teach students Multicore programming.

In collaboration with faculty, staff, parents, and community members, the HT Counseling Department provides students with information, resources, and support to help them achieve academic and personal success. This is a student-centered, individualized approach to meet the needs of each student.

College 101
The purpose of College 101 is to prepare junior students for the college search, application, and selection process. As a college preparatory high school, our students are encouraged to matriculate to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) or post-secondary learning. In College 101, students will be introduced to college search variables and will participate in activities to help them understand this process. Upon completion of the course, all juniors will have a portfolio of personalized college information they can rely on as they start applying for admission to IHEs in their senior year. This is a Pass/Fail requirement for junior students.

Core Strategies for Success I & II
In this course, students will learn essential academic skills that will be used on a daily basis in classes. Students will work on strengthening core content skills in reading, writing and mathematics. They will also address topics such as time management, organization, communication with staff and peers, critical thinking skills, learning styles, note-taking, and test preparation.

Citizens of today’s world are faced with an information explosion; it is an age in which literacy is more important than ever. The English Department seeks to prepare our students for college and beyond by providing them with the skills to successfully read and understand a variety of texts of different genres, purposes, and levels of complexity. We also seek to provide Holy Trinity students with the writing skills necessary to succeed in college as well as in the worlds of business and the professions. Finally, we try to instill in students a love of reading and an understanding that great books educate the heart as well as the mind.

Honors Freshman English
This is an introductory course covering literature, composition, reading, and oral expression for the student who has demonstrated superior ability in reading comprehension and writing as exhibited by the entrance test. The student will read the short story, poetry, drama, novel, and essay with structure in mind, discussing and analyzing genre, character, plot, and theme. The student will write various types of essays, refining his/her existing strengths in sentence construction, idea formation, argument, support, and introductory library research. Writing will be taught as a process of drafting, revising, and revising once again. The student will also work on refining reading skills through a series of vocabulary and comprehension exercises. The student will be encouraged to strengthen oral skills through participation in class discussions and individual and group projects. Finally, the student will be required to complete a five-paragraph essay to satisfy the completion of the course at a passing level.

Freshman English
This is an introductory course covering literature, composition, reading, and oral expression for the student who has demonstrated a basic understanding of the elements of grammar and a basic competence in reading comprehension as exhibited by the entrance test. The student will read the short story, poetry, drama, novel, and essay with structure in mind, discussing and analyzing genre, character, plot, and theme. The student will write various types of essays, refining his/her existing strengths in sentence construction, idea formation, argument support, and introductory library research. Writing will be taught as a process of drafting, revising, and revising once again. The student will also work on refining reading skills through a series of vocabulary and comprehension exercises. The student will be encouraged to strengthen oral skills through participation in class discussions and individual and group projects. Finally, the student will be required to complete a five-paragraph essay to satisfy the completion of the course at a passing level.

Honors Sophomore English
This literature and composition course builds on skills learned in Honors Freshman English, with special emphasis on sharpening critical thinking and literary analysis skills, including close reading of difficult texts. Writing is taught as a process of drafting, revising, and rewriting. Various types of essays are required, but the emphasis is on literary analysis and the research paper. Submission of an original 1,000-word research paper with four or more sources is a requirement for passing this course.

Sophomore English
This literature and composition course builds on and sharpens skills learned in Freshman English, including reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, and oral expression. Writing is taught as a process of drafting, revising, and rewriting. Various types of essays are required, but the emphasis is on literary analysis and the research paper. Students will be guided through the full process of writing the research paper. Submission of an original 1,000-word research paper with four or more sources is a requirement for passing this course.

Honors Junior English
In this course, the student will read novels, poetry, short stories, and non-fiction to explore themes such as the individual and society, American identity, and “the pursuit of happiness” in American literature and culture. The approach of the course is historical, tracing the development of these themes in literature from Native American times to the present. The student learns skills commonly used in the study of literature, writing papers that go beyond basic comprehension to the critical analysis of literary language. The student must also complete a 1,500-word research paper with five or more sources as a requirement for passing this course.

Junior English
In this course, the student will read novels, poetry, short stories, and non-fiction to explore themes such as the individual and society, American identity, and “the pursuit of happiness” in American literature and culture. Material covered comes primarily from the 20th century. The student will learn skills commonly used in the study of literature, writing papers that go beyond basic comprehension to the critical analysis of literary language. The student must also complete a 1,500-word research paper with four or more sources as a requirement for passing this course.

AP Language and Composition
This is a full-year class, satisfying the requirement for Junior English. This class is demanding, meant for students committed to doing college-level work and preparing to excel in college. As such, the class will provide the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical first-year college comp class. Students in this class will learn about elements of argument and composition, and develop critical reading and writing skills. The readings in this class will be skewed toward non-fiction, including persuasive essays, descriptive essays, philosophical and religious meditations, autobiography, memoirs, personal essays, letters, diaries, editorials, and other journalistic pieces. A few classic works of American fiction are also part of the curriculum. Students will not only read and analyze works, but also, “write essays with different aims: for example, to explain an idea, argue a point, or persuade your reader.” Students will have reading or writing 中国体彩app官方下载work every night. They will be required to write major writing assignments in various non-fiction genres, including a research paper. All major writing assignments must be completed and turned in to pass the class. At the end of the school year, all students taking this class will be expected to take the AP test unless special arrangements have been made with the approval of the teacher, department chair, counselor, and principal.

AP English Literature and Composition
This is a college-level literature class. It also is a Dual Credit course in connection with Benedictine University. Students taking this course will be exposed to works of recognized literary merit from a variety of genres, countries, and time periods, but the literature of Great Britain and its former colonies (other than the United States) will be emphasized. The course will provide students with, in the words of the College Board, “the experience of literature, the analysis of literature, and the evaluation of literature.” Analysis of literary works will be guided by traditional critical close reading, but students will also be exposed to other critical approaches. Students will be expected to be able to speak and write intelligently about a work’s structure, style, theme, and tone, as well as its place in a historical context and its underlying philosophical assumptions. In writing about literature, students will learn to produce prose that is persuasive, rhetorically effective, stylistically graceful, and free of errors. Since mastery of the research paper (defined as “achieving a grade of C- or above on an assigned senior research -16- paper”) is a requirement for graduation from Holy Trinity, AP students will meet that requirement. This paper will be graded according to the same rigorous standards as the papers analyzing literature. At the end of the school year, all students taking this class will be expected to take the AP test for Literature and Composition unless special arrangements have been made with the approval of the teacher, department chair, counselor, and principal.

Honors Senior English
This is an intensive survey course in British literature, beginning with Beowulf and continuing on through Shakespeare to the end of the 20TH Century. Works will be studied both thematically and historically. Students entering this class should already be skilled in note-taking, research, critical thinking, expository writing, and high-level class discussion. Heavy emphasis is placed on a sophisticated understanding of difficult texts and on the ability to do close textual analysis. All formal papers must be typed and are required for achieving a passing grade. Students will be required to do several forms of expository writing, including a 2,000-word research paper on an assigned topic. A grade of C or above on the research paper is required for passing the second semester of the course.

Senior English
This is a survey course in British literature. Genres studied include poetry, drama, short story, essay, and novel. Discussion, note-taking and oral expression are emphasized. All formal papers must be typed and are required for achieving a passing grade. Students will be required to do several forms of expository writing, including a 2,000-word research paper on an assigned topic. A grade of C or above on the research paper is required for passing the second semester of the course.

Film Analysis
Film Analysis will study the content of films from different eras, genres, and countries; however, the main focus will be American cinema. Students will watch films, analyze them, and write short papers presenting their ideas about the films. Students will also read and analyze reviews of films and submit criticisms and reviews to various publications.

Speech and Communication
The basics of public speaking, organization, and presentation are offered in a combination of lecture, discussion, and performance. Included are persuasive speaking and utilization of various appeals, speeches to entertain and inspire, demonstrative speeches, oral interpretation, and non-verbal communication. Individual and group activities are taught as well as evaluative techniques.

Creative Writing
This course explores various avenues of written expression, including journaling, creative non-fiction, poetry, drama, and fiction.

Publications Production
This course combines a thorough grounding in all aspects of journalism and the production of the student newspaper, literary magazine, and yearbook with an exploration of all aspects of creative writing, including poetry, drama, fiction, creative non-fiction, and journaling.

There is no place in which art has not shaped society. Art is the expression of the human condition. Through creativity, invention and emotion, artists have shaped our perspectives and lives. It is the mission of the Visual and Performing Arts Department of Holy Trinity High School to provide each student with a strong foundation of skills, techniques, and processes to producing art. We seek to educate both art majors and non-majors to develop into critical thinkers, creative problem-solvers, innovators and compassionate human beings who are life-long learners.

Band
Open to any student without any previous musical training who would like to learn to read music and play a band instrument in an ensemble setting. Depending on personal interest and the instructor’s recommendation based on preliminary try-outs, students will be able to learn one of the following instruments: flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, trombone, tuba, or percussion. Students will be expected to practice their chosen instrument on a daily basis outside of school and will perform on a minimum of two formal concerts during the year.

Concert Band
Open to any student with a minimum of one year of successful previous playing experience on a concert band instrument in a school band setting. Students will continue their study of music -30- theory and history along with the study of progressively more difficult band literature. Students will be expected to practice their chosen instrument on a daily basis outside of school and will perform on a minimum of three formal concerts during the school year. Students will also have additional opportunities to study and perform outside of school with the Merit School of Music based on personal interest and instructor recommendation.

Art 1A: Drawing in Black and White
Art 1A is the beginning course in studying how to draw. Students use pencil, charcoal, and ink to learn to coordinate the eyes and hands in drawing accurately from observation. Basic skills of texture, line, value, proportion, perspective, and design are studied in this first semester of art. At the end of the semester, students will have improved their drawing skills and understanding of the principles of 2-dimensional art.

Art 1B: Working in Color
Art 1B continues the beginning studies of art, working in color with watercolor, pastel, acrylic, and oil pastel. Students will sharpen their sense of design and use of color media with still life subjects and photos as well as student interpretations of themes assigned.

Honors Art Portfolio A
Art 2A continues the study of drawing from life in drawing people. Proportion, bone structure, and portraiture are studied in detail. Students work mostly in black and white media. This course is designed to meet the continuing artistic needs of the advanced art student. It is an individually directed study designed to create a body of work for presentation to an art school or university. Students will strengthen their mastery of personalized media and techniques. At the end of this semester, students will have completed 15 art pieces that will demonstrate an increased understanding of art history, creativity, artistic purpose, media, visual storytelling, and composition.

Honors Art Portfolio B
Art 2B continues the use of the person as a model for most design work in color and a variety of media. The development of skills in rendering, printmaking, and paper fibers contribute to a wonderful portfolio of skills and experiences.

AP 2D Art and Design: Drawing and Painting
Students create a portfolio of work in drawing and/or painting to demonstrate inquiry through art and design and development of materials, processes, and ideas over the course of a year. Portfolios include 20 works of art and design, process documentation, and written information about the work presented. In May, students submit portfolios for evaluation based on specific criteria, which include skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas and sustained investigation through practice, experimentation, and revision, guided by questions. Students must be able to work independently in class and work 5 hours per week beyond class time. The AP exam is a requirement for this course as the content is the entire portfolio submitted for the exam.

Ceramics 1A
Introduction to working in clay with hand-built projects using pinch, coil, and slab methods. Working on the wheel is introduced, as well as glazing techniques, design, and function of 3D art. Short fingernails are required.

Advanced Ceramics
Continuing work in 3D design includes an emphasis on wheel-thrown pottery and some hand building. Complex structures in wheel-thrown work such as teapots are achieved. Short fingernails are required.

AP 3D Art and Design: Ceramics
Students create a portfolio of 3D work in clay to demonstrate inquiry through art and design and development of materials, processes, and ideas over the course of a year. Portfolios include 20 works of art and design, process documentation, and written information about the work presented. In May, students submit portfolios for evaluation based on specific criteria, which include skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas and sustained investigation through practice, experimentation, and revision, guided by questions. Students must be able to work independently in class and work 5 hours per week beyond class time. Short fingernails are required. The AP exam is a requirement for this course as the content is the entire portfolio submitted for the exam.

Graphic Design
This introduction to Graphic Design teaches skills in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and Acrobat (PDFs). Students will create packaging, posters, invitations, company logos, advertisements, and other print-related materials. The emphasis in this class is on design for print, not web or social media. One hour of 中国体彩app官方下载work per night required.

Theater Arts I
This project-based course will allow the student to explore the foundations of storytelling through theater.  Through the lens of various theatrical roles – such as designer, director, playwright, and actor – the student will analyze various theatrical works and styles. The student will then makes choices to bring these works to life. The student will demonstrate what has been learned through writing, presenting, and performing.      

Theater Arts II
This is an intermediate course in theater, which builds upon the skills developed in Theater Arts I. The focus of this courses’ work is on the scripted word, and how the actor interprets and presents the words of others on stage and story-telling through theater. As in Theater Arts I, students will study this through the lens of various theatrical roles – such as designer, director, stage crew and playwright. Students will demonstrate what has been learned through writing, presenting, and performing.

A strong, stable democracy depends on an active and informed citizenry. It is the purpose of the Department of History and Social Studies to help all students of Holy Trinity to develop a knowledge set, analytical tools, and zeal for Judeo-Christian principles so that they will make a positive impact on their local and global communities.

World Geography
The students will study the physical and cultural geography of the various regions of the world. Topics include topography, flora, fauna, natural resources, climate, and demography, as well as, various human cultural features including language, religions, economics, technology, government systems, and everyday customs. Students will become familiar with the unique ways that human beings have adapted to various environmental conditions, the locations of various countries in the world, and the economic and cultural interdependence among them that continues to define our world today.

Honors World History
The student will discover and learn that people and civilizations have always been interdependent. People have exchanged products, skills, and ideas from the beginning of history until the present. The student will learn to appreciate and respect all of the world’s people. S/he will learn to be not only tolerant, but also curious about other people’s ways of life in our shared quest for meaning, freedom, and human rights. Students will be prepared and encouraged to take the AP test in World History in May.

World History
The student will discover and learn that people and civilizations have always been interdependent. People have exchanged products, skills, and ideas from the beginning of history until the present. The student will learn to appreciate and respect the entire world’s people. S/he will learn to be not only tolerant, but also curious about other peoples’ ways of life in our shared quest for meaning, freedom, and human rights.

Honors United States History
The student will gain a fundamental understanding of American history both as a body of knowledge and as a living presence in life by comparing vital documents in whole and in excerpt; by creating timetables on specific historical themes; by striving to understand American society, American institutions and their evolution; by appreciating the sacrifices necessary to keep the ideals and values of American democracy alive; and by practicing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. The student in the honors section must be able to write logically organized essays as assignments and on tests.

United States History
The student will gain a fundamental understanding of American history both as a body of knowledge and as a living presence in life by comparing vital documents in whole and in excerpt; by creating timetables on specific historical themes; by striving to understand American society, American institutions, and their evolution; by appreciating the sacrifices necessary to keep the ideals and values of American democracy alive; and by practicing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills.

American History Since 1865
This dual-credit course with Benedictine University covers the rise of the United States as a global power. We examine the economic, political, and social dimensions of U.S. culture and policy in a global context. Several of the topics of the class include: Reconstruction, -18- industrialization, the rise of the labor movement, the Civil Rights Movement, the Cold War and the War on Terror.

AP US Government and Politics
Students in this course will learn concepts and theories related to U.S. government and politics, analyze data, and apply relevant theories and models to the current government and political situations. This is a required course. This course meets the graduation requirements for Government and Law and the state required Constitution tests and Consumer Economics curriculum. This course also provides a dual credit option from Benedictine University. The Advanced Placement exam in May will be optional for this course.

Government and Law
The student will learn about legal rights and responsibilities and how to analyze and evaluate legal disputes. There will be units on constitutional law and on the practical aspects of criminal, tort, family, and civil rights law. This course meets the graduation requirements for Government and Law and the state required Constitution tests and Consumer Economics curriculum.

Africa, Asia, and Latin America Today
The dominance of Western Europe and the United States in world affairs is being challenged by the rise of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Students will explore current problems and future developments in these regions and how they are impacting the world community. Internet access is necessary.

Holocaust
In this interesting and very timely course, the student will learn how the Holocaust happened and why. Films, discussions, readings, and classroom activities will be used to convey the sufferings of the victims of the Holocaust and other genocides throughout the 20th century.

Honors Psychology
This course is an advanced placement option for students who are enrolled in Psychology. The student will attend regular psychology class, read supplementary materials in addition to regular reading assignments, and will lead the class and small group discussions on various topics. The student will be evaluated using practice A.P. materials. The student will meet with the instructor on a weekly basis while the class is in session, and must agree to prepare for the A.P. exam by attending 5 sessions of test preparation prior to the A.P. exam. To get the full benefit of taking Psychology Honors, it is strongly advised that students take the AP Psychology test in May. which includes payment of the cost of the exam. Credit is not dependent on earning a particular score on the A.P. exam. Under the direction of the instructor, students will research topics and engage in projects to enhance their understanding of the concepts.

Psychology
Psychology is an introductory course mirroring the topics in a typical college class in Psychology. At the conclusion of the course, the students will have a basic understanding of the various areas studied in psychology including such topics as, brain physiology, human development, cognitive, behavioral, and social psychology, mental illness, and treatment. Under the direction of the instructor, students will research topics and engage in projects to enhance their understanding of the concepts.

Honors Economics
Economics underlies many national and world issues. The Honors Economics course develops a basic understanding of the general principles of economic thinking, modern economic theory, and the interdependent nature of the current world economy. The course will cover such topics as supply and demand, inflation, unemployment, the business cycle, national fiscal and monetary policies, dependence on natural resources, trade and surplus and deficit, and international agreements such as NAFTA.

Mathematics should be accessible to every student. Our goal is for each student to reach his or her maximum potential in both the mastery of these skills and understanding of concepts. Math education should not terminate in high school. Our objective is to imbue every student with an appreciation of the beauty of mathematics and the practical knowledge to succeed in college and beyond.

Honors Algebra I
This course is intended for the student who has a facility for performing the four basic operations on rational numbers. The student will learn to solve equations, inequalities, and systems; simplify rational expressions; graph linear equations and systems; use problem-solving strategies, such as looking for and using patterns and inductive reasoning; and develop generalizations and algorithms that may be used in solving real-world problems.

Algebra I
The student will learn to add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative numbers in order to solve equations and evaluate algebraic expressions. The student will be introduced to the graphing of linear equations. The student will learn to solve equation inequalities and use problem-solving strategies to solve real-world problems.

Honors Geometry
The student will be introduced to the proofs of theorems that apply to geometric figures. S/he will use concepts from algebra, geometric theorems, and reasoning to solve problems involving congruency, similarity, parallelism, area and the special properties of various figures. Problems using logic and other strategies will also be touched upon, and basic trigonometry ratios. A strong background in algebra is required.

Geometry
The student will discover the properties of geometric figures using a variety of methods. Using construction tools and everyday objects, s/he will apply these properties to everyday situations and evaluate these properties using algebraic skills and basic concepts and formulas dealing with space geometry.

Honors Algebra II
The student will review the basics of first-year algebra. S/he will perform operations on rational numbers, algebraic expressions, irrational numbers, and complex numbers and will study linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. The student will work on graphing and analyzing linear, quadratic and special functions as well as solving systems of equation problems.

Algebra II
The student will review the basics of first-year algebra. S/he will perform operations on rational numbers, algebraic expressions, irrational numbers, and complex numbers and will study linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. The student will work on graphing and analyzing linear, quadratic and special functions as well as solving systems of equation problems.

Intermediate Mathematics
This course is designed for the student who needs a more solid foundation in core algebra and geometry concepts before continuing on to more advanced algebra and other advanced math classes. The course will reinforce techniques for solving equations and inequalities. Linear functions from an algebraic and geometric viewpoint will be coalesced. Methods for solving systems of linear equations will be practiced. Facility with exponents and exponential functions will be enhanced as will the skills for factoring polynomials and solving quadratic equations.

Discrete Mathematics
In this course, students will learn to represent problems with discrete structures such as matrices, finite graphs, and recurrence relations. Topics also include election theory enumeration and probability.

Honors Precalculus
In this course, the student will study linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. The student will know the basic trigonometric identities and functions. This knowledge will be used to analyze equations and solve problems.

Precalculus
In this course, the student will study linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. The student will know the basic trigonometric identities and functions. This knowledge will be used to analyze equations and solve problems.

AP Calculus AB
In this course, students will explore the key concepts of single-variable calculus including functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, as well as important methods and applications. Students will use technology regularly to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, confirm written work, and reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions. This course is equivalent to a semester of college calculus. Students in this course will have the option to take the AP Calculus AB exam in May. This course also provides a dual credit option from Benedictine University.

To nurture students’ physical health and well-being as they prepare to lead lives of leadership and service.

Physical Education I
This course places emphasis on physical fitness, gross motor, and fine motor development.

Physical Education II
This course is a continuation of Physical Education I. All fundamentals of team sports are taught. A student will also be required to discuss the principles of team play and strategy related to that area. Among the activities offered are flag football, volleyball, basketball, aerobics, track and field, softball, and soccer.

Health
In this course, the student will demonstrate adequate knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of health and how it affects his/her life. The student will cover a health curriculum that will include topics on physical fitness, mental health, nutrition, drugs, body systems, family, and social health.

Wellness/Personal Fitness
This course fulfills the requirements for the second Physical Education class and can be taken in place of or as an additional physical education course for students in grades 10, 11, 12. Students in this course will participate in strength and conditioning programs for various sports and fitness-related activities. Free weights, exercise 中国体彩app官方下载, and conditioning activities will be incorporated to promote improvement in strength, balance, agility, and speed. This class will also provide students with information regarding nutrition and diet, components of fitness, types of fitness programs and wellness concepts. Proper technique, safety precautions, and proper applications of the Principles of Training will be emphasized.                                

Intramurals
Students in this course will participate in intramural activities during the “0” hour from 6:45 to 7:30 a.m., 2-3 days a week. Activities will include such team sports as football, volleyball, floor hockey, and basketball.

A Holy Cross education is not simply measured by a grade, but by the quality of one’s character and a commitment to justice. The Religion Department fulfills this commitment through our religious education program. Our approach is primarily informed by the Holy Scriptures, the teachings of the Catholic Church, and the Holy Cross tradition. At the same time, we strive to create an environment where each student, regardless of experience or perspective, can be included and supported on their own unique faith journey. In an increasingly pluralistic and globalized world, our goal is to help our students become mature, well-rounded, and socially responsible people of faith who recognize their unique responsibility to enact Jesus’ Gospel vision of peace, justice, and radical love for all.

Foundations of Faith
This is the first course in religion you will take at Holy Trinity High School. Throughout this course you will explore topics related to faith, God, Jesus, and the Church. You will also learn valuable information specific to faith life at Holy Trinity, such as an introduction to the Brothers of Holy Cross and celebrating the Catholic Mass. This course will help you get the most out of your time at Holy Trinity and establish a strong, deep foundation on which to build your lifelong relationship with God through Jesus.

Scripture
This course serves as an introduction to the Jewish and Christian Scriptures. In addition to learning the key stories, characters, and themes of the Holy Scripture, students will also study the social, political, and historical world of the Ancient Near East to better understand the context in which the Bible was written. Students will learn specific literary tools and reading techniques for interpreting the pages of Scripture and apply the teachings of Scripture to their lives and their world.

Christian Morality
This course repeatedly encourages students to ask the important questions in life: Is this true? Is this right? What does it mean to live in the light of Christian morality? In addition, we will learn how an individual develops his/her moral views and conscience as well as the foundation on which Christian morality is based. Current moral issues and the debates surrounding them will be examined and discussed in detail, as it is vital to understand these in an ever-changing world. In short, this course aims to give students practical, life-long knowledge to search for and work toward truth, goodness, and beauty.

Church History
This course is an overview of the fundamental beliefs, practices and mission of the Catholic Church in relation to other Christian churches and its historical development from the apostolic age to the present time. Topics of particular emphasis will include: the apostolic origins of Christianity, the relationship of the early Church to the Roman world, the age of the martyrs, the establishment of Christianity as the official religion of the Roman Empire, the Protestant Reformation, the development of the major Christian churches in the Americas, the religious worlds of both African Americans, Hispanic Americans and women in the American Church.

World Religions
The study of the world’s religions will give students the opportunity to explore areas related to the traditions, beliefs, practices, aspirations, and values of millions of people in our world. Through our studies together, students are encouraged to learn about the major religions through the process of inquiry and explanation to develop the ability to think systematically, and to acquire an empathetic understanding of people of various beliefs and religious practices. Major areas of concentration include studying the world’s religions through primal traditions. Each unit emphasizes the rationale and teachings of religion, explores the influence of its leaders in society and examines its impact on everyday activity. Religion affects many aspects of human life and culture. Therefore, students will both engage and gain an appreciation of the search for God and the recognition of both similarities and differences in the world’s religions through explorative study, asking questions, sustaining each student’s search for answers and reflective dialogue.

Vocations/Prayer and Spirituality
This course is centered on God’s invitation and call to Christians to prayer life and to carry out specific and unique functions in society. The course will expose students to various ways God calls and communicates with us as an individual, and as a community, especially within the church. The course will also challenge the student’s critical thinking, reading, and writing abilities while acquiring a stronger knowledge of the meaning of God’s call. At the completion of the course, students will be able to acquire the competence to examine the interdependence between prayer and spirituality and participate consciously and actively in prayer and liturgical life of the church, especially the celebration of the Eucharist. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the meaning of God’s call as an invitation to bear witness to Christ.

Social Justice 
In his 1972 message for the celebration of the Day of Peace, Pope Paul VI famously exclaimed, “If you want peace work for justice!” This course will explore how we, as students of Jesus, can work to create a world of peace defined by justice and radical love. Students will critically examine complex social, political and economic issues such as poverty, racism, violence and peace, immigration, the environment, etc. Through personal experience, the social sciences, the Holy Scriptures, and the social teachings of the Catholic Church, students will gain insight into these issues, foster a sense of compassion for and solidarity with those who suffer from injustice, and discover what they can do to work for justice in their own communities here and now.

Science should be accessible to every student. Our goal is for each student to reach his or her maximum potential in both the mastery of these skills and understanding of concepts. Science education should not terminate in high school. Our objective is to imbue every student with an appreciation of the beauty of science and the practical knowledge to succeed in college and beyond.

Physical Science
This course introduces the student to the basic principles of science through an exploration of chemistry and physics. Students will learn to use the scientific method, make measurements, create data tables, and design experiments. The relationships and interactions of matter and energy will be investigated through hands-on activities, laboratory work, group work, and projects.

Honors Biology
In this course, the principle theories of modern biology, cell theory, biogenesis, and evolution, form the foundation from which the student will explore the variety of organisms on earth. Emphasis is on the biochemical, genetic and cellular similarities shared by all members of the living world.

Biology
In this course, the student will explore the diversity of life on our planet. Emphasis is on the interrelation of all living things, their common features, essential differences, and the role living things play in the everyday lives of humans.

Honors Chemistry
This course will introduce the student to the theories and laws of general chemistry. The student will use the theories and laws to solve in-depth word and mathematical problems. The student will perform and design laboratory experiments to obtain a deeper knowledge of the theories and laws studied.

Chemistry
This course will introduce the student to the theories and laws of general chemistry. The student will use the theories and laws to solve problems and understand the world around them. Laboratory experiments will assist the student in learning the basic theories and laws.

Honors Anatomy/Physiology
This course is designed to build on the comparative animal anatomy and physiology studied in biology. The focus of this course is on the structure and function of the most complex animal: humans. Students will explore the main systems of the human body, their component parts and the way in which they work together to allow humans to survive.

Introduction to Engineering
Introduction to Engineering is a one-semester course with three main goals. The first is to introduce students to the engineering profession and provide students with a broad understanding of what various types of engineers actually do. This goal will be accomplished by reading and studying and in part by hearing first hand from professional engineers. The second goal of the course is to familiarize the student with the engineering mindset and the engineering process such as problem definition, and scope, research, design, planning building, testing, deployment, and maintenance. The third goal of the course is to build engineering skills and knowledge through hands-on project-based learning experiences.

Earth and Space Science
Students will undertake the study of the earth’s place in the universe. This will include topics from astrophysics and astronomy such as the universe and its stars, formation of the solar system, and the history of the planet Earth. The next big idea covered will be Earth processes in which students will study aspects of geology and atmospheric science. Finally, human interaction with the Earth will be studied with concepts from environmental science. The course will feature hands-on inquiry and exploratory labs.

AP Physics 1
AP Physics 1 is equivalent to a one-semester, algebra-based college-level physics course. The goal of the course is to establish a solid foundation in the core principles governing the interactions of objects in the mechanical world, and an introduction to electrostatics and electric current. The course will use hands-on explorations to support inquiry-based learning. Through these explorations, and challenging problem solving, students will develop critical thinking skills necessary for more advanced studies in science. Students in this course will have the option to take the AP Physics 1 exam in May. Topics include kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy, power, impulse, momentum, uniform circular motion, torque, rotation, simple harmonic motion, Newton’s law of gravity, electrostatics, DC circuits, mechanical waves, and sounds. This course also provides a dual credit option from Benedictine University.

Physics
In this course, the student will learn about forces, energy, and momentum. A large emphasis will be on Newton’s laws of motion in both linear and rotational systems. We will study the fundamental forces of gravity, electricity, and magnetism. There will be an emphasis on learning to use mathematics to solve problems in physics.

Astronomy
A dual credit course with Benedictine University, this class examines astronomical phenomena and concepts including the solar system, stars, galaxies, planetary motion, and the evolution of the universe using the physical-scientific mode of inquiry (QPS).

We believe that the best way to learn a language is to use it. The target language is spoken most of the time in class. Students will appreciate not only the language but the culture as well. Practices and strategies are provided to help students gain skills and confidence while using the language to communicate in and out of school. It is the intention of this department that every student attending Holy Trinity has the opportunity to become bilingual by the end of his/her high school career.

Latin I
This course is an introduction to the Latin language, history, and culture of ancient Rome. Language structures are learned by the reading method. The first semester focuses heavily on vocabulary building and will include an introduction to the grammar from each chapter. The second semester includes both grammar and continued vocabulary building. Basic grammatical features include the morphology of nouns, active verbs in the present, future, imperfect, and perfect tenses; adjectives, pronouns, dependent clauses, and participles. Emphasis is on basic vocabulary, translation, and comprehension as a preparation for the ultimate goal of reading classical Latin literature.

Latin II
During the first semester of this course, the reading and comprehension skills developed in Latin I are reinforced and expanded. The historic and cultural focus will be the daily life in the city of Rome. New grammar includes dependent subjunctive clauses, passive verbs, indirect statements, gerunds, and gerundives. During the second semester, students will begin the transition to unadapted Latin readings.

Honors Latin III 
Latin III will be a continuation of Latin II, rounding out the major grammatical concepts of the Latin language. By the end of the academic year, students will begin to read selections from unadapted texts, including Scripture, Caesar’s Gallic Wars, and some of Rome’s greatest poets, such as Martial and Catullus.

Spanish I
This course is designed for students who have limited or no knowledge of Spanish. Students are introduced to basic grammar structures, present-tense verbs, necessary vocabulary, and the Spanish sound system. Students will also learn about some of the cultures, and customs of the Spanish world. At the conclusion of the course, students will be expected to speak, understand, read, and write Spanish at a beginning level.

Spanish II
This course is designed for students who have limited or no knowledge of Spanish. Students are introduced to basic grammar structures, present-tense verbs, necessary vocabulary, and the Spanish sound system. Students will also learn about some of the cultures, and customs of the Spanish world. At the conclusion of the course, students will be expected to speak, understand, read, and write Spanish at a beginning level.

Spanish I for Native Speakers
This course is designed specifically for native or heritage speakers with oral proficiency, but little or no formal training in the language. Generally, these are learners who were raised in 中国体彩app官方下载s where Spanish was spoken. The course is designed to build on the language base students already possess. Spanish-speaking students are not viewed as using an “improper” form of Spanish that is incorrect or needs to be eliminated. Rather, their language is viewed as an extremely valid means of oral communication. The primary purpose of the course is to develop reading and writing skills, although all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are emphasized via cultural and community activities. At the conclusion of the course, students will improve their communication skills and be able to understand video, oral, and written materials, and respond accurately to them at a high level.

Spanish II for Native Speakers
The students will study strategies in reading and listening, comprehension, impersonal and presentational writing, as well as interpersonal and presentational speaking. Topics include Families and Communities, Science and Technology, Beauty and Aesthetics, Contemporary Life, Global Challenges, and Personal and Public Identities. Students will practice high grammar and become familiar with appropriate vocabulary. This course will not use a textbook. The instructor will guide students in online research and projects. Access to the internet and class attendance is critical. Students will be immersed in an environment where the target language is spoken.

Honors Spanish III
This course is designed for students who have successfully finished Spanish II, enjoy learning the language, and want to be bilingual. Students are exposed to activities that require writing, reading, and speaking Spanish, and have the ability to respond in correct and idiomatic Spanish. Students will analyze passages of Spanish literature, discuss them, and express their points of view in oral and written form. Students will also be exposed to real cultural material, visiting cultural centers in the area. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to communicate well in spoken and written Spanish, and they will be able to understand Spanish by listening and reading at a high level.

AP Spanish Language and Culture
Students will develop proficiency and integrate their language skills to be prepared for the exam. They will be provided with a variety of tools to practice and strategies they need to gain both the skills and the confidence for success. They will be exposed to a broad variety of authentic materials and activities to assess communicative and cultural competency in a holistic way. All tasks will be drawn from six diverse content areas, or themes, that provide a meaningful context for the communication tasks students will face on the exam. The entire course is designed with a college course rigor. To ensure that the AP Spanish Language Exam is maintained at its intended level, special studies are carried out periodically to establish the comparability of performance of college students completing a 3rd-year Spanish language course. The AP Exam for AP Spanish Language and Culture is required and payment for the course is to be completed by the student.